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International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies
ISSN: 2028-9324     CODEN: IJIABO     OCLC Number: 828807274     ZDB-ID: 2703985-7
 
 
Friday 14 December 2018

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  Call for Papers - February 2019     |     Now IJIAS is indexed in EBSCO, ResearchGate, ProQuest, Chemical Abstracts Service, Index Copernicus, IET Inspec Direct, Ulrichs Web, Google Scholar, CAS Abstracts, J-Gate, UDL Library, CiteSeerX, WorldCat, Scirus, Research Bible and getCited, etc.  
 
 
 

Economic assessment of medicinal plants debarked by riparian population of Lokoli swampy forest (Southern Benin)


Volume 25, Issue 1, December 2018, Pages 149–161

 Economic assessment of medicinal plants debarked by riparian population of Lokoli swampy forest (Southern Benin)

Yvonne Tété Cakpo-Tossou1, Judith Korb2, and Brice Sinsin3

1 Laboratoire d'Ecologie Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, Abomey-Calavi, Benin
2 Faculty of Biology 1, University of Freiburg, Germany
3 Laboratoire d'Ecologie Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, Abomey-Calavi, Benin

Original language: English

Received 18 August 2018

Copyright © 2018 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


The relevance of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) to community members no longer needs to be proven; these resources contribute mainly to nutrition and health care in many rural areas in Africa. This study aims at identifying medicinal plant species subject to tree bark commercialization in the Lokoli swampy forest and its surrounded farmlands located in southern Benin (West Africa). We analyzed the economic profitability of medicinal tree bark. Three groups of collectors were identified: G1 sells bark locally (G1), G2 at medium-distant markets (< 50km) and G3 at distant markets (> 50 km). We identified a total of 17 medicinal plant species belonging to 13 families of which 11 tree bark species were commonly recorded: Anogeissus leiocarpa, Bridelia ferruginea, Khaya senegalensis, Kigelia africana, Lannea acida, Maranthes polyandra, Nauclea diderrichii, Parkia biglobosa, Pterocarpus erinaceus, Syzygium owariense and Terminalia glaucescens. The net income as well as the economic profitability depended on the group to which collectors belonged. Bark collectors make returns from 31.7±5.45 to 319.0±26.35$ US, annually. The economic profitability ranged from 23% to 54% of the invested costs. The break-even point and safety margin were higher for G3 than G1 and G2 collectors. Similar results were registered for net income and profitability. The most valuable tree bark species were K. africana, M. polyandra, S. owariense, and K. senegalensis.

Author Keywords: medicinal plants, plant bark, net income, economic profitability, safety margin.


How to Cite this Article


Yvonne Tété Cakpo-Tossou, Judith Korb, and Brice Sinsin, “Economic assessment of medicinal plants debarked by riparian population of Lokoli swampy forest (Southern Benin),” International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 149–161, December 2018.