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International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies
ISSN: 2028-9324     CODEN: IJIABO     OCLC Number: 828807274     ZDB-ID: 2703985-7
 
 
Monday 25 May 2020

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  Call for Papers - June 2020     |     Now IJIAS is indexed in EBSCO, ResearchGate, ProQuest, Chemical Abstracts Service, Index Copernicus, IET Inspec Direct, Ulrichs Web, Google Scholar, CAS Abstracts, J-Gate, UDL Library, CiteSeerX, WorldCat, Scirus, Research Bible and getCited, etc.  
 
 
 

A SEMANTIC DIVERSITY OF SOME SHI VERBS: AN OBSTACLE TO PEOPLE LEARNING MASHI AS THEIR SECOND LANGUAGE


Volume 29, Issue 2, May 2020, Pages 267–274

 A SEMANTIC DIVERSITY OF SOME SHI VERBS: AN OBSTACLE TO PEOPLE LEARNING MASHI AS THEIR SECOND LANGUAGE

Jean Pierre Polepole Bicuncuma1 and Bashimbe Baharanyi Jean-Pierre2

1 Junior lecturer of English at INSTITUT SUPERIEUR PEDAGOGIQUE DE WALUNGU, RD Congo
2 Walungu Teachers Training College, RD Congo

Original language: English

Received 25 January 2020

Copyright © 2020 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


The natives of Bushi speak Mashi, a language that brings about confusion to its learners since a single verb may bear more than one meaning. By dint of noticing that this is an obstacle to the mastery of the language in question, we have tried to explain and bring more light to the matter. To do so, we have collected some Shi verbs, namely the ones we thought were useful for the fulfillment of the present work. It was realized that people who learn Mashi as their second language ignore that the latter is a tone language. This is mostly manifested in Shi verbs. Besides, we have noticed that a learner of Mashi needs to pay much attention to vocalic length, and also the context or circumstances in which any single Shi utterance is provided.

Author Keywords: Semantic, diversity, obstacle, tone, Mashi.


How to Cite this Article


Jean Pierre Polepole Bicuncuma and Bashimbe Baharanyi Jean-Pierre, “A SEMANTIC DIVERSITY OF SOME SHI VERBS: AN OBSTACLE TO PEOPLE LEARNING MASHI AS THEIR SECOND LANGUAGE,” International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 267–274, May 2020.